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Waitangi Day New Zealand

New Zealand, Māori Aotearoa, island country in the South Pacific Ocean, the southwesternmost part of Polynesia. New Zealand is a remote land—one of the last sizable territories suitable for habitation to be populated and settled—and lies more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) southeast of Australia, its nearest neighbour. The country comprises two main islands—the North and the South Island—and a number of small islands, some of them hundreds of miles from the main group. The capital city is Wellington and the largest urban area Auckland; both are located on the North Island. New Zealand administers the South Pacific island group of Tokelau and claims a section of the Antarctic continent. Niue and the Cook Islands are self-governing states in free association with New Zealand. New Zealand is a land of great contrasts and diversity. Active volcanoes, spectacular caves, deep glacier lakes, verdant valleys, dazzling fjords, long sandy beaches, and the spectacular snowcapped peaks of the Southern Alps/Kā Tiritiri o te Moana on the South Island—all contribute to New Zealand’s scenic beauty. New Zealand also has a unique array of vegetation and animal life, much of which developed during the country’s prolonged isolation. It is the sole home, for example, of the long-beaked, flightless kiwi, the ubiquitous nickname for New Zealanders. New Zealand was the largest country in Polynesia when it was annexed by Great Britain in 1840. Thereafter it was successively a crown colony, a self-governing colony (1856), and a dominion (1907). By the 1920s it controlled almost all of its internal and external policies, although it did not become fully independent until 1947, when it adopted the Statute of Westminster. It is a member of the Commonwealth. The ascent of Mount Everest by New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary with Sherpa Tenzing Norgay in 1953 was one of the defining moments of the 20th century. “In some ways,” Hillary suggested, “I believe I epitomise the average New Zealander: I have modest abilities, I combine these with a good deal of determination, and I rather like to succeed.” Despite New Zealand’s isolation, the country has been fully engaged in international affairs since the early 20th century, being an active member of a number of intergovernmental institutions, including the United Nations. It has also participated in several wars, including World Wars I and II. Economically the country was dependent on the export of agricultural products, especially to Great Britain. The entry of Britain into the European Community in the early 1970s, however, forced New Zealand to expand its trade relations with other countries. It also began to develop a much more extensive and varied industrial sector. Tourism has played an increasingly important role in the economy, though this sector has been vulnerable to global financial instability. The social and cultural gap between New Zealand’s two main groups—the indigenous Māori of Polynesian heritage and the colonizers and later immigrants from the British Isles and their descendants—has decreased since the 1970s, though educational and economic differences between the two groups remain. Immigration from other areas—Asia, Africa, and eastern Europe—has also made a mark, and New Zealand culture today reflects these many influences. Minority rights and race-related issues continue to play an important role in New Zealand politics. Land New Zealand is about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) long (north-south) and about 280 miles (450 km) across at its widest point. The country has slightly less surface area than the U.S. state of Colorado and a little more than the United Kingdom. About two-thirds of the land is economically useful, the remainder being mountainous. Because of its numerous harbours and fjords, the country has an extremely long coastline relative to its area. Relief of New Zealand Although New Zealand is small, its geologic history is complex. Land has existed in the vicinity of New Zealand for most of the past 500 million years. The earliest known rocks originated as sedimentary deposits some 545 million to 540 million years ago, at the close of Precambrian time (4.6 billion to 541 million years ago) and the beginning of the Cambrian Period (541 million to 485 million years ago); their source area was probably the continental forelands of Australia and Antarctica, then part of a nearby single supercontinent. Continental drift (the movement of large plates of Earth’s crust) created a distinct island arc and oceanic trench structure by the Carboniferous Period (about 359 to 299 million years ago), when deposition began in the downwarps (trenches) of the sedimentary rocks that today make up some three-fourths of New Zealand. This environment lasted about 250 million years and is typified by both downwarped oceanic sedimentary rocks and terrestrial volcanic rocks. This period was terminated in the west at the beginning of the Cretaceous Period (about 145 million years ago) by the Rangitata Orogeny (mountain-building episode), although downwarp deposition continued in the east. These mountains were slowly worn down by erosion, and the sea transgressed, eventually covering almost all of the land. At the end of the Oligocene Epoch (about 23 million years ago), the Kaikōura Orogeny began, raising land above the sea again, including the Southern Alps/Kā Tiritiri o te Moana of the South Island. Many of the great earth movements associated with this final orogeny took place (and take place today) along faults, which divide the landscape into great blocks, chief of which is the Alpine Fault of the South Island. The erosion and continued movement of these faulted blocks, together with the continuing volcanism of the North Island, define to a large extent the landscape of the country. New Zealand is part of the Ring of Fire—the circum-Pacific seismic belt marked by frequent earthquakes and considerable volcanic activity. The North Island and the western part of the South Island are on the Indian-Australian Plate, and the remainder of the South Island is on the Pacific Plate. Their collision creates violent seismic activity in subduction zones and along faults. Numerous earthquakes occur annually, including hundreds that can be felt by New Zealanders. A number of these temblors have been disastrous, such as one that devastated the towns of Napier and Hastings in 1931 and a series of quakes that did likewise in Christchurch in 2010–11. Both the North and the South islands are roughly bisected by mountains. Swift snow-fed rivers drain from the hills, although only in the east of the South Island have extensive alluvial plains been built up. The alluvial Canterbury Plains contrast sharply with the precipitous slopes and narrow coastal strip of the Westland region on the west coast of the South Island. The Southern Alps/Kā Tiritiri o te Moana are a 300-mile- (480-km-) long chain of fold mountains containing New Zealand’s highest mountain—Aoraki/Mount Cook at 12,316 feet (3,754 metres)—and some 20 other peaks that rise above 10,000 feet (3,000 metres), as well as an extensive glacier system with associated lakes. There are more than 360 glaciers in the Southern Alps/Kā Tiritiri o te Moana. The Tasman Glacier, the largest in New Zealand, with a length of 18 miles (29 km) and a width of more than 0.5 mile (0.8 km), flows down the eastern slopes of Aoraki/Mount Cook. Other important glaciers on the eastern slopes of the Southern Alps/Kā Tiritiri o te Moana are the Murchison, Mueller, and Godley; the Fox and Franz Josef are the largest on the western slopes. The North Island has seven small glaciers on the slopes of Mount Ruapehu. In the north of the South Island, the Alps break up into steep upswelling ridges. On their western face there are mineral deposits, and to the east they continue into two parallel ranges, terminating in a series of sounds. To the south the Alps break up into rugged, dissected country of difficult access and magnificent scenery, particularly toward the western tip of the island (called Fiordland). On its eastern boundary this wilderness borders a high central plateau called Central Otago, which has an almost continental climate. The terrain of the North Island is much less precipitous than that of the South and has a more benign climate and greater economic potential. In the centre of the island, the Volcanic Plateau rises abruptly from the southern shores of Lake Taupō, New Zealand’s largest natural lake, itself an ancient volcanic crater. To the east, ranges form a backdrop to rolling country in which pockets of highly fertile land are associated with the river systems. To the south, more ranges run to the sea. On the western and eastern slopes of these ranges, the land is generally poor, although the western downland region is fertile until it fades into a coastal plain dominated by sand dunes. To the west of the Volcanic Plateau, fairly mountainous country merges into the undulating farmlands of the Taranaki region, where the mild climate favours dairy farming even on the slopes of Mount Taranaki (Mount Egmont), a volcano that has been dormant since the 17th century. North of Mount Taranaki are the spectacular Waitomo caves, where stalactites and stalagmites are illuminated by thousands of glowworms. The northern shores of Lake Taupō bound a large area of high economic activity, including forestry. Even farther north there are river terraces sufficiently fertile for widespread dairy and mixed farming. The hub of this area is Auckland, which is situated astride an isthmus with a deep harbour on the east and a shallow harbour on the west. The peninsular region north of Auckland, called Northland, becomes gradually subtropical in character, marked generally by numerous deep-encroaching inlets of the sea bordered by mangrove swamps. More … Source: https://www.britannica.com/place/New-Zealand

New Ambassador of NewZealand to Latvia, H.E. Ms Alana Hudson, discuss Łotwy Nowej Zelandii bilateral cooperation.

State Secretary @andrispelss and the new Ambassador of NewZealand to Latvia, H.E. Ms Alana Hudson, discuss Flaga Łotwy Nowej Zelandii bilateral cooperation, including the development of economic ties & exchange of high-level visits on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of diplomatic relations.

Spotkanie z Ambasadorem Nowej Zelandii

Szef Biura Polityki Międzynarodowej minister Jakub Kumoch spotkał się z Ambasadorem Nadzwyczajnym i Pełnomocnym Nowej Zelandii w Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej Mary Patricią Thurston. Ambasador wkrótce kończy swoją misję dyplomatyczną w Polsce, którą rozpoczęła 13 września 2017 roku.

Waitangi Day

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