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Republic Day of Islamic Republic Of Pakistan

Pakistan, populous and multiethnic country of South Asia. Having a predominately Indo-Iranian speaking population, Pakistan has historically and culturally been associated with its neighbours Iran, Afghanistan, and India. Since Pakistan and India achieved independence in 1947, Pakistan has been distinguished from its larger southeastern neighbour by its overwhelmingly Muslim population (as opposed to the predominance of Hindus in India). Pakistan has struggled throughout its existence to attain political stability and sustained social development. Its capital is Islamabad, in the foothills of the Himalayas in the northern part of the country, and its largest city is Karachi, in the south on the coast of the Arabian Sea. Pakistan was brought into being at the time of the partition of British India, in response to the demands of Islamic nationalists: as articulated by the All India Muslim League under the leadership of Mohammed Ali Jinnah, India’s Muslims would receive just representation only in their own country. From independence until 1971, Pakistan (both de facto and in law) consisted of two regions—West Pakistan, in the Indus River basin in the northwestern portion of the Indian subcontinent, and East Pakistan, located more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) to the east in the vast delta of the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system. In response to grave internal political problems that erupted in civil war in 1971, East Pakistan was proclaimed the independent country of Bangladesh. Pakistan encompasses a rich diversity of landscapes, starting in the northwest, from the soaring Pamirs and the Karakoram Range through a maze of mountain ranges, a complex of valleys, and inhospitable plateaus, down to the remarkably even surface of the fertile Indus River plain, which drains southward into the Arabian Sea. It contains a section of the ancient Silk Road and the Khyber Pass, the famous passageway that has brought outside influences into the otherwise isolated subcontinent. Lofty peaks such as K2 and Nanga Parbat, in the Pakistani-administered region of Kashmir, present a challenging lure to mountain climbers. Along the Indus River, the artery of the country, the ancient site of Mohenjo-daro marks one of the cradles of civilization. Yet, politically and culturally, Pakistan has struggled to define itself. Established as a parliamentary democracy that espoused secular ideas, the country has experienced repeated military coups, and religion—that is to say, adherence to the values of Sunni Islam—has increasingly become a standard by which political leaders are measured. In addition, northern Pakistan—particularly the Federally Administered Tribal Areas—has become a haven for members of neighbouring Afghanistan’s ousted Taliban regime and for members of numerous other Islamic extremist groups. In various parts of the country, instances of ethnic, religious, and social conflict have flared up from time to time, often rendering those areas virtually ungovernable by the central authorities, and acts of violence against religious minorities have increased. At the time of partition in 1947, as many as 10 million Muslim refugees fled their homes in India and sought refuge in Pakistan—about 8 million in West Pakistan. Virtually an equal number of Hindus and Sikhs were uprooted from their land and familiar surroundings in what became Pakistan, and they fled to India. Unlike the earlier migrations, which took centuries to unfold, these chaotic population transfers took hardly one year. The resulting impact on the life of the subcontinent has reverberated ever since in the rivalries between the two countries, and each has continued to seek a lasting modus vivendi with the other. Pakistan and India have fought four wars, three of which (1948–49, 1965, and 1999) were over Kashmir. Since 1998 both countries have also possessed nuclear weapons, further heightening tensions between them. Land Pakistan is bounded by Iran to the west, Afghanistan to the northwest and north, China to the northeast, and India to the east and southeast. The coast of the Arabian Sea forms its southern border. Since 1947 the Kashmir region, along the western Himalayas, has been disputed, with Pakistan, India, and China each controlling sections of the territory. Part of the Pakistani-administered territory comprises the so-called Azad Kashmir (“Free Kashmir”) region—which Pakistan nonetheless considers an independent state, with its capital at Muzaffarabad. The remainder of Pakistani-administered Kashmir consists of Gilgit and Baltistan, known collectively as the Northern Areas. More … Score: https://www.britannica.com/place/Pakistan

Wizyta ambasadora Pakistanu w stolicy Wielkopolski

Mariusz Wiśniewski, zastępca prezydenta Poznania przyjął w czwartek w urzędzie miasta Malika Muhammada Farooqa, ambasadora Pakistanu w Polsce. Malik Muhammad Farooq pełni misję w Polsce od kwietnia 2020 roku. Wcześniej pracował m.in. w placówkach dyplomatycznych Pakistanu w Kuala Lumpur, Frankfurcie czy Kathmandu.

Wizyta ambasadora Pakistanu w stolicy Wielkopolski

Malik Muhammad Farooq pełni misję w Polsce od kwietnia 2020 roku. Wcześniej pracował m.in. w placówkach dyplomatycznych Pakistanu w Kuala Lumpur, Frankfurcie czy Kathmandu. - Chciałbym, żeby do Polski przyjeżdżało więcej pakistańskich studentów i turystów. Polska to bardzo piękne państwo - podkreślał ambasador.

Ambasador Pakistanu z wizytą w Lublinie

W dniu 13 grudnia 2021 r. Ambasador Islamskiej Republiki Pakistanu, Jego Ekscelencja Malik Muhammad Farooq spotkał się z Panem Arturem Szymczykiem, Zastępcą Prezydenta Miasta Lublin ds. Inwestycji i Rozwoju. Wśród poruszanych podczas wizyty Ambasadora tematów znalazły się: możliwości organizacji edukacji oraz wsparcia studentów pakistańskich przy podejmowaniu przez nich studiów na lubelskich uczelniach.

Ambasador Islamskiej Republiki Pakistanu z wizytą na UMCS

13 grudnia 2021 roku przedstawiciele władz rektorskich Uniwersytetu Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej spotkali się z Ambasadorem Islamskiej Republiki Pakistanu, Jego Ekscelencją Malikiem Muhammadem Farooqiem, który odwiedził nasz Uniwersytet w ramach cyklu spotkań z polskimi instytucjami szkolnictwa wyższego.

Ambasador Pakistanu z wizytą na PW

Współpraca w zakresie wymiany studentów, doktorantów i pracowników naukowych była głównym tematem spotkania z Ambasadorem Pakistanu w Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej Malikiem Muhammadem Farooqem. Ambasador rozmawiał z Rektorem PW prof. dr. hab. inż. Krzysztofem Zarembą, Prorektorem ds. Nauki prof. dr. hab. inż. Mariuszem Malinowskim i Dyrektorem Centrum Współpracy Międzynarodowej Grzegorzem Robakiem.

Republic Day of Islamic Republic Of Pakistan

Pakistan, populous and multiethnic country of South Asia. Having a predominately Indo-Iranian speaking population, Pakistan has historically and culturally been associated with its neighbours Iran, Afghanistan, and India. Since Pakistan and India achieved independence in 1947, Pakistan has been distinguished from its larger southeastern neighbour by its overwhelmingly Muslim population (as opposed to the predominance of Hindus in India). Pakistan has struggled throughout its existence to attain political stability and sustained social development. Its capital is Islamabad, in the foothills of the Himalayas in the northern part of the country, and its largest city is Karachi, in the south on the coast of the Arabian Sea. Pakistan was brought into being at the time of the partition of British India, in response to the demands of Islamic nationalists: as articulated by the All India Muslim League under the leadership of Mohammed Ali Jinnah, India’s Muslims would receive just representation only in their own country. From independence until 1971, Pakistan (both de facto and in law) consisted of two regions—West Pakistan, in the Indus River basin in the northwestern portion of the Indian subcontinent, and East Pakistan, located more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) to the east in the vast delta of the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system. In response to grave internal political problems that erupted in civil war in 1971, East Pakistan was proclaimed the independent country of Bangladesh. Pakistan encompasses a rich diversity of landscapes, starting in the northwest, from the soaring Pamirs and the Karakoram Range through a maze of mountain ranges, a complex of valleys, and inhospitable plateaus, down to the remarkably even surface of the fertile Indus River plain, which drains southward into the Arabian Sea. It contains a section of the ancient Silk Road and the Khyber Pass, the famous passageway that has brought outside influences into the otherwise isolated subcontinent. Lofty peaks such as K2 and Nanga Parbat, in the Pakistani-administered region of Kashmir, present a challenging lure to mountain climbers. Along the Indus River, the artery of the country, the ancient site of Mohenjo-daro marks one of the cradles of civilization. Yet, politically and culturally, Pakistan has struggled to define itself. Established as a parliamentary democracy that espoused secular ideas, the country has experienced repeated military coups, and religion—that is to say, adherence to the values of Sunni Islam—has increasingly become a standard by which political leaders are measured. In addition, northern Pakistan—particularly the Federally Administered Tribal Areas—has become a haven for members of neighbouring Afghanistan’s ousted Taliban regime and for members of numerous other Islamic extremist groups. In various parts of the country, instances of ethnic, religious, and social conflict have flared up from time to time, often rendering those areas virtually ungovernable by the central authorities, and acts of violence against religious minorities have increased. At the time of partition in 1947, as many as 10 million Muslim refugees fled their homes in India and sought refuge in Pakistan—about 8 million in West Pakistan. Virtually an equal number of Hindus and Sikhs were uprooted from their land and familiar surroundings in what became Pakistan, and they fled to India. Unlike the earlier migrations, which took centuries to unfold, these chaotic population transfers took hardly one year. The resulting impact on the life of the subcontinent has reverberated ever since in the rivalries between the two countries, and each has continued to seek a lasting modus vivendi with the other. Pakistan and India have fought four wars, three of which (1948–49, 1965, and 1999) were over Kashmir. Since 1998 both countries have also possessed nuclear weapons, further heightening tensions between them. Land Pakistan is bounded by Iran to the west, Afghanistan to the northwest and north, China to the northeast, and India to the east and southeast. The coast of the Arabian Sea forms its southern border. Since 1947 the Kashmir region, along the western Himalayas, has been disputed, with Pakistan, India, and China each controlling sections of the territory. Part of the Pakistani-administered territory comprises the so-called Azad Kashmir (“Free Kashmir”) region—which Pakistan nonetheless considers an independent state, with its capital at Muzaffarabad. The remainder of Pakistani-administered Kashmir consists of Gilgit and Baltistan, known collectively as the Northern Areas. More … Score: https://www.britannica.com/place/Pakistan

Wojewoda spotkał się z ambasadorem Pakistanu

Goszczący 16 grudnia 2019 roku w Poznaniu ambasador Pakistanu Shafqat Ali Khan spotkał się z wojewodą wielkopolskim Łukaszem Mikołajczykiem. Podczas kurtuazyjnej wizyty rozmawiano między innymi o możliwościach współpracy, dalszym rozwoju na płaszczyźnie gospodarki, kultury i nauki oraz wzajemnych relacjach obu krajów. Spotkanie było także okazją do przedstawienia rysu historycznego Pakistanu oraz przypomnienia najważniejszych sylwetek polskich pilotów i inżynierów, którzy pod dowództwem pilota Władysława Turowicza oraz jego żony stworzyli pakistańskie siły lotnicze.

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