Wydarzenia Święta narodowe Przydatne Linki Film promujący Kontakt
Polsko-jemeńskie konsultacje polityczne

Polska wspiera suwerenność, niepodległość i integralność terytorialną Jemenu. Konieczne jest wypracowanie trwałego rozwiązania politycznego. Dlatego apelujemy do wszystkich stron o konstruktywne zaangażowanie się w proces prowadzony pod auspicjami ONZ, zaprzestanie wszelkich działań zbrojnych i powstrzymanie przemocy – powiedział wiceminister Paweł Jabłoński w trakcie polsko-jemeńskich konsultacji politycznych, przeprowadzonych 28 września 2021 roku w Warszawie.

Ambasador SR Wietnamu z wizytą w siedzibie Sejmiku

Wizyta wietnamskiej delegacji w Szczecinie rozpoczęła się od odwiedzin Zamku Książąt Pomorskich. To tam odbyło się spotkanie Ambasadora Republiki Wietnamu Nguyen Hunga z Marszałkiem Województwa Zachodniopomorskiego Olgierdem Geblewiczem. Poruszono na nim głównie tematy gospodarcze oraz rozważano możliwości nawiązania współpracy zachodniopomorskich firm z wietnamskimi partnerami.W rozmowie uczestniczyli poseł na Sejm RP Grzegorz Napieralski i Przewodniczący Komisji Gospodarki, Infrastruktury i Ochrony Środowiska Sejmiku Województwa Zachodniopomorskiego Artur Nycz.

Republic of Yemen Reunification Day

Yemen, country situated at the southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula. It is mostly mountainous and generally arid, though there are broad patches with sufficient precipitation to make agriculture successful. The people speak various dialects of Arabic and are mostly Muslims (see Islam). The history, culture, economy, and population of Yemen have all been influenced by the country’s strategic location at the southern entrance of the Red Sea—a crossroads of both ancient and modern trade and communications routes. In the ancient world, the states that occupied the area known today as Yemen controlled the supply of such important commodities as frankincense and myrrh and dominated the trade in many other valuable items, such as the spices and aromatics of Asia. Because of its fertility as well as its commercial prosperity, Yemen was the location of a number of ancient kingdoms; for that same reason, it was known to the ancient Romans as Arabia Felix (Latin: “Fortunate Arabia”) to distinguish it from the vast forbidding reaches of Arabia Deserta (“Desert Arabia”). Later, Yemen was the place where coffee (Arabic: qahwah) was first cultivated commercially, and, before the introduction of coffee plants to other parts of the world, it was long the sole source of that precious bean. The present Republic of Yemen came into being in May 1990, when the Yemen Arab Republic (North Yemen) merged with the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen (South Yemen). By stipulation of the unification agreement, Sanaa, formerly the capital of North Yemen, functions as the political capital of the country, while Aden, formerly the capital of South Yemen, functions as the economic centre. The two components of Yemen underwent strikingly different histories: whereas North Yemen never experienced any period of colonial administration at the hands of a European power, South Yemen was a part of the British Empire from 1839 to 1967. The contemporary borders are largely a product of the foreign policy goals and actions of Britain, the Ottoman Empire, and Saudi Arabia. Postunification Yemen has been burdened by chronic corruption and economic hardship. Divisions based on religion, tribalism, and geography continue to play an important role in Yemeni politics, sometimes leading to violence. Even during the age of colonial hegemony, Yemen remained for the most part one of the most secluded regions of the world. Much the same can be said today; few outsiders travel Yemen’s rugged hinterland, many parts of which have been little influenced by central government authority. It is perhaps this splendid isolation that has captivated the imagination of many from abroad. For all its remoteness, Yemen is likewise a country of great physical beauty, photogenic and picturesque, with a life and verdancy in the highlands unlike that found elsewhere on the Arabian Peninsula. Walter B. Harris, a journalist and traveler, visited Yemen in 1892. One of the first Westerners to see many parts of the country, he recounted his impressions in the book A Journey Through the Yemen, in which he says: Nothing can be imagined more beautiful than the scenery of the mountains of the Yemen. Torn into all manner of fantastic peaks, the rocky crags add a wildness to a view that otherwise possesses the most peaceful charms. Rich green valleys, well timbered in places, and threaded by silvery streams of dancing water; sloping fields, gay with crops and wildflowers; the terraced or jungle-covered slopes,—all are so luxuriant, so verdant, that one’s ideas as to the nature of Arabia are entirely upset. Well known as is, and always has been, the fertility of this region, its extent is almost startling, and it can little be wondered at that Alexander the Great intended, after his conquest of India, to take up his abode in the Yemen. … Land of Yemen Most of Yemen’s northern frontier with Saudi Arabia traverses the great desert of the peninsula, the Rubʿ al-Khali (“Empty Quarter”), and until 2000 remained undemarcated, as did the eastern frontier with Oman until 1992. Yemen is bounded to the south by the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea and to the west by the Red Sea. Yemen’s territory includes a number of islands as well, including the Kamarān group, located in the Red Sea near Al-Ḥudaydah; the Ḥanīsh Islands, in the southern Red Sea; Perim (Barīm) Island, in the Bab el-Mandeb Strait, which separates the Arabian Peninsula from Africa; Socotra (Suquṭrā), Yemen’s most important and largest island, located in the Arabian Sea nearly 620 miles (1,000 km) east of Aden; and the Brothers (Al-Ikhwān), a group of small islets near Socotra. Relief and drainage Yemen may be divided into five major regions: a coastal plain running north-south known as the Tihāmah (an extension of the Tihāmat ʿAsīr), the western highlands, the central mountains (the Yemen Highlands), the eastern highlands, and finally the eastern and northeastern desert regions. The coastal plain ranges in width from 5 miles (8 km) to as much as 40 miles (65 km). Low mountains rising from 1,000 to 3,500 feet (300 to 1,100 metres) lie between the low hills of the plain and the great central massif, which has many peaks in excess of 10,000 feet (3,000 metres); the highest is Mount Al-Nabī Shuʿayb, which rises to 12,336 feet (3,760 metres). Toward the east-northeast, the mountains subside rather rapidly into the eastern highlands (2,500–3,500 feet [750–1,100 metres]), which drop off to the sandy hills of the Rubʿ al-Khali. Yemen is an arid country, and there are no permanent watercourses. The regular rainfall that occurs in some areas drains, in the northern part, westward toward the Red Sea through five major watercourses (wadis) and, in the southern part, southward into the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea through three major watercourses. The largest of the latter is the Wadi Ḥaḍramawt (Hadhramaut Valley), which has been renowned since antiquity for its frankincense trees and which historically has been the locus of a number of sophisticated city-states. Together with their tributaries and lesser neighbours, these intermittently flowing channels slice the highlands and central massif into a large number of plateaus and ridges. In many places there is evidence of volcanic activity from as recently as a few hundred years ago; the existence of hot springs and fumaroles (volcanic vents) attests to continued subterranean activity. Moreover, the country sits astride one of the most active fault lines in the Red Sea region (Great Rift Basin) and has experienced several severe earthquakes in modern times, including one that shook the Dhamar area in December 1982, killing about 3,000 people and largely destroying several villages and hundreds of smaller settlements. Soils throughout the country vary from sandy to loamy, and most are low in organic matter, thus limiting agricultural options. In some areas, however, elaborate agricultural terraces cover the mountains from base to peak. The high agricultural productivity of this system is largely attributable to the soil that has been collected and enriched with compost over a period of centuries. In the modern period, neglect and civil conflict have taken their toll on the earthworks, which are particularly vulnerable to erosion. Still, the terraces are largely intact and are a breathtaking feature of mountainous Yemen. More … Score: https://www.britannica.com/place/Yemen

Odwiedź Jemen - Archipelag Sokotry

Sokotra mierzy ok. 130 km długości i 40 km szerokości i jest drugą co do wielkości afrykańską wyspą. Politycznie Sokotra, wraz z sąsiednimi wysepkami Abd al-Kuri, Samha i Darsa należy do Jemenu, ale geograficznie jest częścią Afryki - jest naturalnym geologicznym przedłużeniem Przylądka Guardafui, leżącego w Somalii. Izolacja sprawiła, że obecnie około jedna trzecia gatunków roślin występujących na Sokotrze nie rośnie w innych miejscach na Ziemi. Wśród 825 gatunków roślin, które można spotkać na wyspie, 307 to gatunki endemiczne.