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Independence Day of the Republic of Fiji

Fiji, country and archipelago in the South Pacific Ocean. It surrounds the Koro Sea about 1,300 miles (2,100 km) north of Auckland, New Zealand. The archipelago consists of some 300 islands and 540 islets scattered over about 1,000,000 square miles (3,000,000 square km). Of the 300 islands, about 100 are inhabited. The capital, Suva, is on the southeast coast of the largest island, Viti Levu (“Great Fiji”). Land of Fiji - Relief Fiji has a complex geologic history. Based on a submerged platform of ancient formation, the Fiji islands are largely the product of volcanic action, sedimentary deposit, and formations of coral. Viti Levu has an area of about 4,000 square miles (10,000 square km) and accounts for more than half of Fiji’s land area. A jagged dividing range running from north to south has several peaks above 3,000 feet (900 metres), including Tomanivi (formerly Mount Victoria), at 4,344 feet (1,324 metres) the highest point in Fiji. The main river systems—the Rewa, Navua, Sigatoka (Singatoka), and Ba (Mba)—all have their headwaters in the central mountain area. To the southeast and southwest, as well as to the south where the range divides, the mountains give way to plateaus and then lowlands. The coastal plains in the west, northwest, and southeast account for less than one-fifth of Viti Levu’s area but are the main centres of agriculture and settlement. Vanua Levu, the second largest island, has an area of about 2,140 square miles (5,540 square km). It is divided along its length by a mountain range with peaks rising to more than 3,000 feet. On the island’s northern coast, away from the mouth of the Dreketi (Ndreketi) River, the coastal plains are narrow. Most of the other islands, including the Lomaiviti, Lau, and Yasawa groups, are volcanic in origin, but, like the major islands, they are bounded by coral reefs, offshore rocks, and shoals that make the Koro Sea hazardous for navigation. Climate At Suva the average summer high temperature is in the mid-80s F (about 29 °C), and the average winter low is in the high 60s F (about 20 °C); temperatures typically are lower in elevated inland areas. All districts receive the greatest amount of rainfall in the season from November through March, during which time tropical cyclones (hurricanes) are also experienced perhaps once every two years. While rainfall is reduced in the east of the larger islands from April to October, giving an annual average of about 120 inches (3,000 mm) per year, it virtually ceases in the west, to give an annual rainfall that approaches 70 inches (about 1,800 mm), thus making for a sharp contrast in both climatic conditions and agriculture between east and west. Plant and animal life Almost half of Fiji’s total area remains forested, while dry grasslands are found in western areas of the large islands. Coconut palms are common in coastal areas, and almost all tropical fruits and vegetables can be grown. Much of the shoreline is composed of reefs and rocks, while mangrove swamps are found on eastern coasts. There are few white-sand swimming beaches and, because of the encircling reef, little surf. Most animals, including pigs, dogs, cattle, and a few horses, are domesticated. Mongooses, introduced to prey on snakes and rats, are often seen. People of Fiji - Ethnic groups Although the indigenous Fijian people are usually classified as ethnically Melanesian, their social and political organization is closer to that of Polynesia, and there has been a high level of intermarriage between Fijians from the Lau group of islands of eastern Fiji and the neighbouring Polynesian islands of Tonga. Indigenous Fijians make up more than half the population; about another two-fifths are people of Indian descent, most of whom are descendants of indentured labourers brought to work in the sugar industry. A small number of Indians, particularly in commerce and in professions such as medicine and law, are descended from free migrants. There are minorities of part-Europeans, Chinese, and Pacific Islanders who have origins outside Fiji. In the last group is the Polynesian population of the Fijian dependency of Rotuma—an island of 18 square miles (47 square km) located about 400 miles (645 km) north-northwest of Suva—and the Banabans. The latter were forced to leave their home island, Banaba, now part of Kiribati, after destruction during World War II made it uninhabitable. Many Banabans settled on Rabi (Rambi) Island, off the eastern coast of Vanua Levu. Languages and religion English, Fijian, and Fijian Hindi were given equal status as official languages by the 1997 constitution. The widely used Fijian language has many dialects; the one most commonly used is known as Bauan Fijian and comes from Bau (Mbau), an island that enjoyed political supremacy at the advent of colonial rule. Most people speak at least two languages, including English and the language of their own ethnic community. Almost all indigenous Fijians are Christian, mostly Methodist. Most Indians are Hindu, though a significant minority are Muslim. About one-tenth of the population is Roman Catholic, and there is a small Assemblies of God community. Settlement patterns There is little intermarriage between ethnic communities. While Suva has a very mixed population, the sugar-producing regions of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu have predominantly Indian populations. On the smaller islands and in less-developed rural areas of the larger islands, indigenous Fijians live in traditional villages. About half the population lives in urban areas. The three largest urban centres are on Viti Levu: Suva, in the southeast, with about one-fourth of Fiji’s total population; Nasinu, a suburb of Suva that experienced rapid growth in the late 20th and early 21st centuries; and Lautoka, in northwestern Viti Levu, the centre of the sugar industry and the location of a major port. Labasa (Lambasa), on Vanua Levu, is a centre for administration, services, and sugar production. Demographic trends The population of Fiji is young. More than one-fourth of the population is under the age of 15, and another one-fourth is between the ages of 15 and 29. For four decades after World War II, indigenous Fijians were outnumbered by Indians. However, after the government was overthrown in 1987, many Indians fled to Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, and Fijians regained a plurality. With rapid urbanization, especially on the fringes of Suva, came the emergence of squatter settlements and some social problems. The disparities of income between urban and rural workers, contrasting lifestyles within the urban areas, and high urban unemployment can be seen as factors that have contributed to both an escalating rate of crime and the rapid growth of a trade union movement. More … Score: https://www.britannica.com/place/Fiji-republic-Pacific-Ocean