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Ambasada Gruzji w RP zorganizowała pokaz filmu „Shindisi”.

W związku z rocznicą militarnej agresji Rosji przeprowadzonej na pełną skalę przeciwko Gruzji, 9 sierpnia br. Ambasada Gruzji w RP zorganizowała pokaz filmu „Shindisi”. Do zaproszonych gości zwróciła się Pani Nino Baakashvili, Chargé d'affaires Ambasady, która w swoim przemówieniu szczegółowo omówiła rosyjską interwencję w Gruzji w sierpniu 2008 roku, rosyjską agresję i poważne konsekwencje obecnej okupacji.

Independence Day of Georgia

Georgia, Georgian Sakartvelo, country of Transcaucasia located at the eastern end of the Black Sea on the southern flanks of the main crest of the Greater Caucasus Mountains. It is bounded on the north and northeast by Russia, on the east and southeast by Azerbaijan, on the south by Armenia and Turkey, and on the west by the Black Sea. Georgia includes three ethnic enclaves: Abkhazia, in the northwest (principal city Sokhumi); Ajaria, in the southwest (principal city Batʿumi); and South Ossetia, in the north (principal city Tskhinvali). The capital of Georgia is Tbilisi (Tiflis). The roots of the Georgian people extend deep in history; their cultural heritage is equally ancient and rich. During the medieval period a powerful Georgian kingdom existed, reaching its height between the 10th and 13th centuries. After a long period of Turkish and Persian domination, Georgia was annexed by the Russian Empire in the 19th century. An independent Georgian state existed from 1918 to 1921, when it was incorporated into the Soviet Union. In 1936 Georgia became a constituent (union) republic and continued as such until the collapse of the Soviet Union. During the Soviet period the Georgian economy was modernized and diversified. One of the most independence-minded republics, Georgia declared sovereignty on November 19, 1989, and independence on April 9, 1991. The 1990s were a period of instability and civil unrest in Georgia, as the first postindependence government was overthrown and separatist movements emerged in South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Land - Relief, drainage, and soils With the notable exception of the fertile plain of the Kolkhida Lowland—ancient Colchis, where the legendary Argonauts sought the Golden Fleece—the Georgian terrain is largely mountainous, and more than a third is covered by forest or brushwood. There is a remarkable variety of landscape, ranging from the subtropical Black Sea shores to the ice and snow of the crest line of the Caucasus. Such contrasts are made more noteworthy by the country’s relatively small area. The rugged Georgia terrain may be divided into three bands, all running from east to west. To the north lies the wall of the Greater Caucasus range, consisting of a series of parallel and transverse mountain belts rising eastward and often separated by deep, wild gorges. Spectacular crest-line peaks include those of Mount Shkhara, which at 16,627 feet (5,068 metres) is the highest point in Georgia, and Mounts Rustaveli, Tetnuld, and Ushba, all of which are above 15,000 feet. The cone of the extinct Mkinvari (Kazbek) volcano dominates the northernmost Bokovoy range from a height of 16,512 feet. A number of important spurs extend in a southward direction from the central range, including those of the Lomis and Kartli (Kartalinian) ranges at right angles to the general Caucasian trend. From the ice-clad flanks of these desolately beautiful high regions flow many streams and rivers. The southern slopes of the Greater Caucasus merge into a second band, consisting of central lowlands formed on a great structural depression. The Kolkhida Lowland, near the shores of the Black Sea, is covered by a thick layer of river-borne deposits accumulated over thousands of years. Rushing down from the Greater Caucasus, the major rivers of western Georgia, the Inguri, Rioni, and Kodori, flow over a broad area to the sea. The Kolkhida Lowland was formerly an almost continually stagnant swamp. In a great development program, drainage canals and embankments along the rivers were constructed and afforestation plans introduced; the region has become of prime importance through the cultivation of subtropical and other commercial crops. To the east the structural trough is crossed by the Meskhet and Likh ranges, linking the Greater and Lesser Caucasus and marking the watershed between the basins of the Black and Caspian seas. In central Georgia, between the cities of Khashuri and Mtsʿkhetʿa (the ancient capital), lies the inner high plateau known as the Kartli (Kartalinian) Plain. Surrounded by mountains to the north, south, east, and west and covered for the most part by deposits of the loess type, this plateau extends along the Kura (Mtkvari) River and its tributaries. The southern band of Georgian territory is marked by the ranges and plateaus of the Lesser Caucasus, which rise beyond a narrow, swampy coastal plain to reach 10,830 feet in the peak of Didi-Abuli. A variety of soils are found in Georgia, ranging from gray-brown and saline semidesert types to richer red earths and podzols. Artificial improvements add to the diversity. Climate The Caucasian barrier protects Georgia from cold air intrusions from the north, while the country is open to the constant influence of warm, moist air from the Black Sea. Western Georgia has a humid subtropical, maritime climate, while eastern Georgia has a range of climate varying from moderately humid to a dry subtropical type. There also are marked elevation zones. The Kolkhida Lowland, for example, has a subtropical character up to about 1,600 to 2,000 feet, with a zone of moist, moderately warm climate lying just above; still higher is a belt of cold, wet winters and cool summers. Above about 6,600 to 7,200 feet there is an alpine climatic zone, lacking any true summer; above 11,200 to 11,500 feet snow and ice are present year-round. In eastern Georgia, farther inland, temperatures are lower than in the western portions at the same altitude. Western Georgia has heavy rainfall throughout the year, totaling 40 to 100 inches (1,000 to 2,500 mm) and reaching a maximum in autumn and winter. Southern Kolkhida receives the most rain, and humidity decreases to the north and east. Winter in this region is mild and warm; in regions below about 2,000 to 2,300 feet, the mean January temperature never falls below 32 °F (0 °C), and relatively warm, sunny winter weather persists in the coastal regions, where temperatures average about 41 °F (5 °C). Summer temperatures average about 71 °F (22 °C). In eastern Georgia, precipitation decreases with distance from the sea, reaching 16 to 28 inches in the plains and foothills but increasing to double this amount in the mountains. The southeastern regions are the driest areas, and winter is the driest season; the rainfall maximum occurs at the end of spring. The highest lowland temperatures occur in July (about 77 °F [25 °C]), while average January temperatures over most of the region range from 32 to 37 °F (0 to 3 °C). More … Score: https://www.britannica.com/place/Georgia

ქვემო სილეზიის რეგიონსა და აჭარის ავტონომიურ რესპუბლიკას შორის არსებული თანამშრომლობის 5 წლისთავისადმი და ასევე პოლონეთის მეორე რესპუბლიკაში მცხოვრებ ქართველ ემიგრანტებისადმი მიძღვნილ გამოფენებთან დაკავშირებულ ღონისძიებებს.

2021 წლის 10 მარტს, საქართველოს საელჩოს საქმეთა დროებითი რწმუნებული, ნინო ბააკაშვილი დაესწრო ქალაქ ვროცლავში, ქვემო სილეზიის რეგიონსა და აჭარის ავტონომიურ რესპუბლიკას შორის არსებული თანამშრომლობის 5 წლისთავისადმი და ასევე პოლონეთის მეორე რესპუბლიკაში მცხოვრებ ქართველ ემიგრანტებისადმი მიძღვნილ გამოფენებთან დაკავშირებულ ღონისძიებებს.

Wizyta Ambasadora Gruzji

Ilia Darchiashvili, Ambasador Gruzji w Polsce, był w dniu 19.06.2020 roku gościem marszałka Cezarego Przybylskiego. Wizyta miała charakter roboczy, a rozmowy dotyczyły dotychczasowej i przyszłej współpracy. W spotkaniu uczestniczył także Wojciech Wróbel, Konsul Honorowy Gruzji we Wrocławia. Podczas rozmów podsumowano dotychczasową partnerską współpracę, a także omówiono wsparcie podejmowane na rzecz obywateli Gruzji znajdujących się na terenie Dolnego Śląska w ostatnich miesiącach.

Rondo poświęcone gruzińskim oficerom

Rondo Gruzińskich Oficerów Wojska Polskiego – taką nazwę nosi oficjalnie od dziś rondo przy węźle Autostradowej Obwodnicy Wrocławia w ciągu ulicy Granicznej. W uroczystości uczestniczył marszałek Cezary Przybylski. Wniosek o nadanie nowej nazwy złożył Ilia Darchiashvili, Ambasador Gruzji w Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej, a stosowną uchwałę podjęto jeszcze w ubiegłym roku. W dzisiejszej uroczystości uczestniczyła również delegacja gruzińska, która od kilku dni przebywa z wizytą na dolnym Śląsku.

Wizyta delegacji Autonomicznej Republiki Adżarii

Z wizytą na Dolnym Śląsku gości delegacja gruzińska. Oprócz przedstawicieli lokalnych władz znaleźli się w niej również przedstawiciele Uniwersytetu Państwowego z Batumi. Kooperacja uczelni wyższych to kolejny element stale rozwijającej się współpracy Dolnego Śląska i Autonomicznej Republiki Adżarii.