Archiwum

Newsletter January-June 2022 / Newsletter Styczeń-Czerwiec 2022

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/24

Cérémonie de remise du label LabelFrancEducation au lycée n°11 de Lodz

L’Attachée de coopération éducative, Fabienne Ricordel, a remis le label LabelFrancEducation au Lycée n°11 de Lodz lors d’une cérémonie organisée le 2 juin 2022 dans l’établissement. Les représentants des autorités éducatives locales et les acteurs francophones de la région étaient au rendez-vous et ont pu apprécier la présentation historique de l’établissement réalisée en français par les élèves et le spectacle de chansons francophones.

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/24

第21届“汉语桥”世界大学生中文比赛波兰赛区比赛举行

5月26日,第21届“汉语桥”世界大学生中文比赛波兰赛区决赛在波兰南部城市奥波莱落幕,来自波兹南密兹凯维奇大学的刘艾琳(Aleksandra Łukasiewicz)夺得冠军,她将代表波兰赛区参加下一阶段的全球决赛。本次比赛由中国驻波兰大使馆主办,奥波莱孔子学院承办,有来自弗罗茨瓦夫、波兹南、克拉科夫等地的14名选手参赛,比赛分为主题演讲、知识问答、才艺展示三个环节。比赛中,选手们分享了自己学习中文的故事,阐述了对“天下一家”和人类命运共同体理念的认知和理解,展示了有关中国国情、文化知识等方面的知识储备。在“才艺展示”环节,选手们各显神通,展示了中国舞、中文歌、脱口秀、乐器演奏以及剪纸和中国书法等。

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/24

Saint John the Baptist Day

Hospitallers, also spelled Hospitalers, also called Order of Malta or Knights of Malta, formally (since 1961) Sovereign Military and Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem, of Rhodes, and of Malta, previously (1113–1309) Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem, (1309–1522) Order of the Knights of Rhodes, (1530–1798) Sovereign and Military Order of the Knights of Malta, or (1834–1961) Knights Hospitaller of St. John of Jerusalem, a religious military order that was founded at Jerusalem in the 11th century and that, headquartered in Rome, continues its humanitarian tasks in most parts of the modern world under several slightly different names and jurisdictions. Heraldic flagsBanner: The blazon of the shield is applied to the whole surface of a square or a vertically or horizontally oriented rectangular flag. This is the Royal Banner of Scotland, which follows the blazon of the second quarter of the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom. Although it is the banner of the sovereign, it is widely but incorrectly used today as the national symbol.Fork-tailed pennon: Shown here is that of the Sovereign and Military Order of the Knights of Malta, in heraldic terms gules a cross argent.Standard: The Cross of St. George at the hoist identifies this as English. The profusion of badges, the diagonally placed motto, and the border of alternating tinctures are typical. This is the standard of Sir Henry Stafford, c. 1475. Drawing by Wm. A. Norman, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. The origin of the Hospitallers was an 11th-century hospital founded in Jerusalem by Italian merchants from Amalfi to care for sick and poor pilgrims. After the Christian conquest of Jerusalem in 1099 during the First Crusade, the hospital’s superior, a monk named Gerard, intensified his work in Jerusalem and founded hostels in Provençal and Italian cities on the route to the Holy Land. The order was formally named and recognized on February 15, 1113, in a papal bull issued by Pope Paschal II. Raymond de Puy, who succeeded Gerard in 1120, substituted the Augustinian rule for the Benedictine and began building the power of the organization. It acquired wealth and lands and combined the task of tending the sick with defending the Crusader kingdom. Along with the Templars, the Hospitallers became the most formidable military order in the Holy Land. When the Muslims recaptured Jerusalem in 1187, the Hospitallers removed their headquarters first to Margat and then, in 1197, to Acre. When the Crusader principalities came to an end after the fall of Acre in 1291, the Hospitallers moved to Limassol in Cyprus. In 1309 they acquired Rhodes, which they came to rule as an independent state, with right of coinage and other attributes of sovereignty. Under the order’s rule, the master (grand master from c. 1430) was elected for life (subject to papal confirmation) and ruled a celibate brotherhood of knights, chaplains, and serving brothers. For more than two centuries these Knights of Rhodes were the scourge of Muslim shipping on the eastern Mediterranean. They constituted the last Christian outpost in the East. By the 15th century the Turks had succeeded the Arabs as the protagonists of militant Islam, and in 1522 Süleyman the Magnificent laid final siege to Rhodes. After six months the Knights capitulated and on January 1, 1523, sailed away with as many of the citizens as chose to follow them. For seven years the wandering Knights were without a base, but in 1530 the Holy Roman emperor Charles V gave them the Maltese archipelago in return, among other things, for the annual presentation of a falcon to his viceroy of Sicily. The superb leadership of the grand master Jean Parisot de la Valette prevented Süleyman the Magnificent from dislodging the Knights from Malta in 1565 in one of the most famous sieges in history, which ended in a Turkish disaster. What was left of the Turkish navy was permanently crippled in 1571 at the Battle of Lepanto by the combined fleets of several European powers that included the Knights of Malta. The Knights then proceeded to build a new Maltese capital, Valletta, named after la Valette. In it they built great defense works and a hospital of grand dimensions that attracted many physically and mentally ill patients from outside Malta. Thereafter the Knights continued as a territorial sovereign state in Malta but gradually gave up warfare and turned wholly to territorial administration and to medical care. In 1798, however, their reign in Malta came to an end, when Napoleon, on his way to Egypt, occupied the island. The order’s return to Malta was provided for in the Treaty of Amiens (1802) but eliminated by the Treaty of Paris (1814), which assigned Malta to Great Britain. In 1834 the Knights of Malta became permanently established in Rome. From 1805 they were ruled by lieutenants until Pope Leo XIII revived the office of grand master in 1879. A new constitution containing a more precise definition of both the religious and the sovereign status of the order was adopted in 1961, and a code was issued in 1966. Although the order no longer exercises territorial rule, it issues passports, and its sovereign status is recognized by the Holy See and some other Roman Catholic states. Membership is confined to Roman Catholics, and the central organization is essentially aristocratic, being ruled chiefly by a primary class of “professed” knights of justice and chaplains who can prove the nobility of their four grandparents for two centuries. More …. Score: https://www.britannica.com/event/Siege-of-Rhodes

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/24

National Day. Birthday of the Grand Duchess of Luxembourg Charlotte von Nassau-Weilburg

Luxembourg, country in northwestern Europe. One of the world’s smallest countries, it is bordered by Belgium on the west and north, France on the south, and Germany on the northeast and east. Luxembourg has come under the control of many states and ruling houses in its long history, but it has been a separate, if not always autonomous, political unit since the 10th century. The ancient Saxon name of its capital city, Lucilinburhuc (“Little Fortress”), symbolized its strategic position as “the Gibraltar of the north,” astride a major military route linking Germanic and Frankish territories. Luxembourg is a point of contact between the Germanic- and Romance-language communities of Europe, and three languages are regularly employed in the grand duchy itself: Luxembourgish, German, and French. The peoples of Luxembourg and their languages reflect the grand duchy’s common interests and close historical relations with its neighbours. In the 20th century Luxembourg became a founding member of several international economic organizations. Perhaps most importantly, the grand duchy was an original member of the Benelux Economic Union (1944), which linked its economic life with that of the Netherlands and of Belgium and would subsequently form the core of the European Economic Community (EEC; ultimately succeeded by the European Union). Land - Relief and soils The northern third of Luxembourg, known as the Oesling (Ösling), comprises a corner of the Ardennes Mountains, which lie mainly in southern Belgium. It is a plateau that averages 1,500 feet (450 metres) in elevation and is composed of schists and sandstones. This forested highland region is incised by the deep valleys of a river network organized around the Sûre (or Sauer) River, which runs eastward through north-central Luxembourg before joining the Moselle (or Mosel) River on the border with Germany. The Oesling’s forested hills and valleys support the ruins of numerous castles, which are a major attraction for the region’s many tourists. The fertility of the relatively thin mountain soils of the region was greatly improved with the introduction in the 1890s of a basic-slag fertilizer, which is obtained as a by-product of the grand duchy’s steel industry. The southern two-thirds of Luxembourg is known as the Bon Pays, or Gutland (French and German: “Good Land”). This region has a more-varied topography and an average elevation of 800 feet (about 245 metres). The Bon Pays is much more densely populated than the Oesling and contains the capital city, Luxembourg, as well as smaller industrial cities such as Esch-sur-Alzette. In the centre of the Bon Pays, the valley of the northward-flowing Alzette River forms an axis around which the country’s economic life is organized. Luxembourg city lies along the Alzette, which joins the Sûre farther north. In the east-central part of the Bon Pays lies a great beech forest, the Müllerthal, as well as a sandstone area featuring an attractive ruiniform topography. The country’s eastern border with Germany is formed (successively from north to south) by the Our, Sûre, and Moselle rivers. The slopes of the Moselle River valley, carved in chalk and calcareous clay, are covered with vineyards and receive a substantial amount of sunshine, which has earned the area the name “Little Riviera.” Besides vineyards, the fertile soils of the Moselle and lower Sûre valleys also support rich pasturelands. Luxembourg’s former iron mines are located in the extreme southwest, along the duchy’s border with France. Climate Luxembourg has a mild climate with considerable precipitation. The north is slightly colder and more humid than the south. The mean temperatures in Luxembourg city range from the mid-30s F (about 0.7 °C) in January to the low 60s F (about 17 °C) in July, but in the Oesling both extremes are slightly lower. The Oesling receives more precipitation than the Bon Pays, but the greatest amount, about 40 inches (1,000 mm), and the least, about 27 inches (about 685 mm), fall in the southwest and southeast, respectively. The sheltered valley of the Moselle River benefits from a gentler and sunnier climate than does the rest of the duchy. People - Ethnic groups, languages, and religion Luxembourg has been one of the historic crossroads of Europe, and myriad peoples have left their bloodlines as well as their cultural imprints on the grand duchy. The Celts, the Belgic peoples known as the Treveri, the Ligurians and Romans from Italy, and especially the Franks were most influential. The language spoken by Luxembourg’s native inhabitants is Luxembourgish, or Lëtzebuergesch, a Moselle-Franconian dialect of German that has been enriched by many French words and phrases. Luxembourgish is the national language; German and French are both languages of administration. There is a strong sense of national identity among Luxembourgers despite the prevalence of foreign influences. The great majority of Luxembourg’s native citizens are Roman Catholic, with a small number of Protestants (mainly Lutherans), Jews, and Muslims. Lxembourg has a high proportion of foreigners living within its borders. This is chiefly the result of an extremely low birth rate among native Luxembourgers, which has led to a chronic labour shortage. Nearly half of the total population is of foreign birth and consists mainly of Portuguese, French, Italians, Belgians, and Germans. Among the foreign workers are many in the iron and steel industry, and numerous others work in foreign firms and international organizations located in the capital. Settlement patterns Northern Luxembourg is sparsely populated compared with the heavily urbanized and industrialized south. The north’s rural population is clustered in villages of thick-set stone houses with slate roofs. The urban network in the south is dominated by the capital city, Luxembourg, which rises in tiers, with the upper (and older) section of the city separated from the lower-lying suburbs by the gorges of the Alzette and Petrusse rivers. A newer quarter housing many European organizations nestles in a picturesque site carved into the river valley’s sandstone cliffs. The second largest city in Luxembourg, Esch-sur-Alzette, lies in the extreme southwest and is a traditional iron- and steel-making centre. Its growth, like that of the neighbouring iron and steel centres of Pétange, Differdange, and Dudelange, has slowed since the shrinkage of those industries in western Europe in the late 20th century. The remainder of the country’s population lives in towns and villages of relatively small size. Many of Luxembourg’s villages date from ancient Celtic and Roman times or originated in Germanic and Frankish villages after about 400 ce. In addition, many medieval castle villages continue to thrive, centuries after the castles themselves fell into ruin. More : Score: https://www.britannica.com/place/Luxembourg

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/23

Visita del esgrimista venezolano, Rubén Limardo, en la Embajada de Venezuela en Varsovia

El embajador de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela en la República de Polonia, Luis Gómez Urdaneta, en compañía de su esposa Natalia Simon, recibieron al destacado deportista venezolano Rubén Limardo, radicado en la ciudad de Łódź, Polonia en la sede de nuestra embajada en Varsovia.

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/22

“La defensa del dragón” y “Mateo” se proyectaron en el Ciclo de Cine Colombiano en Cracovia

Como parte del Plan de Promoción de Colombia en el Exterior, la Embajada de Colombia en Polonia y el Consulado Honorario de Colombia en Cracovia, junto con el Centro Latino y el Krakowskie Forum Kultury, continuaron con la realización del ciclo de cine colombiano 2022 con la proyección de “La defensa del dragón” y “Mateo”. Las proyecciones se realizaron los días 9 y 23 de mayo respectivamente, en las instalaciones del Krakowskie Forum Kultury.

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/22

Ambasador Indii z wizytą w UAM

Wizyta rozpoczęła się od wykładu dla studentów Wydziału Neofilologii i spotkania z pracownikami tego wydziału. Podczas spotkania z rektor prof. Bogumiłą Kaniewską poruszono kilka ważnych tematów, w tym tegoroczne obchody 75-lecia niepodległości Indii, rozwój studiów indologicznych w UAM, udział indyjskich historyków w nadchodzącym Międzynarodowym Kongresie Nauk Historycznych, możliwości współpracy naukowej między UAM i uczelniami w Indiach oraz współpracę w promocji kultury i literatury indyjskiej w Polsce oraz polskiej w Indiach.

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/21

Wizyta studentów w ramach projektu „Akcja Dyplomacja”

W ramach projektu „Akcja Dyplomacja” Ambasada Francji w Polsce po raz kolejny otworzyła drzwi studentom ze Szkoły Głównej Handlowej w Warszawie. Spotkanie, które poprowadzili przedstawiciele różnych działów ambasady miało na celu przedstawienie roli i działalności Ambasady i Instytutu Francuskiego w Polsce, stosunków francusko-polskich w kontekście europejskim oraz priorytetów francuskiej prezydencji w Radzie Unii Europejskiej #EU2022FR.

Czytaj więcej

2022/06/21